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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bsuir.bsum.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/11409/549

Title: INFLUENCE OF PERSONALITY TRAITS AND STRESS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING AMONG STUDENTS IN SCHOOLS OF NURSING AND MIDWIFERY MAKURDI
Authors: DZER, BENJAMIN TERZUNGWE
Keywords: PERSONALITY TRAITS ,
STRESS, PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING
Issue Date: Jun-2019
Publisher: NONE
Citation: NONE
Series/Report no.: NONE;
Abstract: This study investigated influence of personality traits and stress on psychological well-being among students in schools of nursing and midwifery, Makurdi. The study employed the ex post facto research design. The Big Five Personality traits Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Ryff’s Scale of psychological well-being were used to collect data from the participants. The participants constituted 25 (10.2%) males and 220 (89.8%) females with a mean age of 0.992. The study tested three hypotheses and each of the hypotheses tested six dimensions of Ryff’s psychological well-being using simple linear regression and multiple linear regressions. Result in hypothesis (1a) showed a significant outcome for conscientiousness, openness and neuroticism on psychological well-being (autonomy) [F (5,239) = 181.093, P < .001. Hypothesis (1b) likewise had a significant outcome for conscientiousness, openness and neuroticism on psychological well-being (environmental mastery) [F (5,329) = 44.720, P < .001. Hypothesis (1c) was accepted for conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness on psychological well-being (personal growth) [F (5, 237) = 71.964, P < .001. Hypothesis (1d) was confirmed for conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness on psychological well-being (positive relations with others) [F (5,239) = 77.131, P < .001. Hypothesis (1e) was accepted for all except extraversion on psychological well-being (purpose in life) [F (5,239) = 53.709, P < .001. Hypothesis (1f) was confirmed only for openness on psychological well-being (self-acceptance) [F (2,237) = 28.625 P < .001. Hypotheses (2a) to (2f) rejected the postulation of stress on all the dimensions of psychological well-being. Likewise, hypotheses (3a) to (3f) also rejected the joint predictions of personality traits and stress on psychological well-being among students. In conclusion, Personality traits significantly predicted psychological well-being of students in schools of nursing and midwifery, Makurdi. Particularly, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness personality trait was found to influence psychological well-being while extraversion and agreeableness where the lowest personality traits influencing psychological well-being among students. In the contrary, stress rather positively predicted student’s psychological well-being as against earlier postulation that stress will negatively and significantly influence psychological well-being among students. Based on the findings, that personality traits and stress did not jointly influence psychological well-being among students in schools of nursing and midwifery, Makurdi. Recommentions, more empirical research be geared towards student nurses’/midwives’ psychological well-being owning to their different personality traits in the course of their professional program. More so, research should be focused on Ryff’s dimensions of psychological well-being since psychological well-being is not a single construct but multidimensional to assist student nurses/midwives gain optimal psychological well-being.
URI: http://bsuir.bsum.edu.ng:8080/jspui/handle/11409/549
Appears in Collections:Psychology

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